Transit Accessible Attractions

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#23: Six Flags: Discovery Kingdom

Posted on September 2, 2015 at 10:15 AM Comments comments (0)

This week on Transit Accessible Attractions we'll be featuring Six Flags: Discovery Kingdom.


Six Flags: Discovery Kingdom is one of the best amusement parks in the Bay Area. The 140-acre roller-coaster-filled park features all sorts of different roller coasters - wooden, looping, gravity-defying, twisting, everything! 


While you may have never heard of it, there is, in fact, public transportation to Six Flags. SolTrans provides two lines from the North Bay to Six Flags, 5 and 85. 


The 5 runs between Vallejo Transit Center and the Larkspur Ferry, to Six Flags. The bus stop for Six Flags is on Faregrounds Drive @ Six Flags: Discovery Kingdom. 


The 85 runs from Vallejo Transit Center to Sereno Transit Center to Six Flags (same stop as the 5). The line then continues north to Fairfield via I-80.


Stay tuned next week to find out which attraction we'll feature next!

#22: Tech Museum of Innvoation

Posted on August 26, 2015 at 3:15 AM Comments comments (0)

This week on Transit Accessible Attractions we will be talking about the Tech Museum.


The Tech Museum is a hands-on technology and innovative science museum located in the heart of Silicon Valley. It provides a great family fun trip and you can play there all day and not getting bored. It is located in the middle of Downtown San Jose. They also offer many programs for young adults and exhibits.


Since the Tech Museum is located in the Downtown part of San Jose, transportation is very convenint in the area. The VTA bus routes 23, 63, 64, 65, 66, 68, 81, 82, 161, 182, 304, 323, and DASH serve the surrounding area. It is a short walk from all those routes.

 

From Fremont BART, take VTA Express route 181 to San Fernando and Almaden and take a short walk from there.

 

VTA Light Rail is a great option if you're riding from the South Bay, with great connections to CalTrain - Just take the Mountain View – Winchester or Alum Rock – Santa Teresa to Convention Center Station.


Stay tuned next week to find out which attraction we'll feature next!

#21: Fox Theater

Posted on August 19, 2015 at 9:55 AM Comments comments (0)

This week on Transit Accessible Attractions we'll be talking about the Fox Theater.


The Fox Theater, for the longest time, was a grand building with a big history. The theater opened on October 27th, 1928, greeted by much-anticipating crowds. The theater closed in 1965 after significant decreases of ticket sales. The Fox Theater quickly fell into disrepair, so much so that the City of Oakland almost demolished the building in 1975, to become a parking lot.


The developer, Mann Theater Group, proceeded to sell the Fox Theater for $340.000 dollars, but plans to revitalize the building never materialized. The building remained disused for 21 years. In 1996, the Oakland Redevelopment Agency bought the Fox Theater for $3 million. Friends of The Oakland Fox, formed by the Oakland Heritage Alliance, began work on the decrepit theater. Additional funding was provided in 2004.


In 2009, after decades of neglect, the Fox Theater officially opened. Today, six years later, the Fox Theater is one of the prettiest buildings in America, with a remarkable dome, incredible architecture, and amazing colors.


The Fox Theater is located on one of Oakland's busiest streets, Telegraph Ave. Accessible by many forms of transportation, the Fox is one of the best attractions to reach by transit. 


If you are riding BART, exit and 19th Street/Oakland, on Broadway, and walk one block up 19th Street. Cross the street, and you're literally at the entrance to the theater!


AC Transit also provides convenient access, with more than a dozen buses traveling around the Fox Theater. Bus lines 1, 1R, 11, 12, 18, 51A, 58L, 72, 72M, 72R, 800, 802, 805, 851 and NL all stop at 19th Street/Oakland BART.


If you are riding the San Francisco Bay Ferry to the Fox Theater, walk through Jack London Square until you reach Broadway (you can't miss it!). If you want a walk, you can walk up Broadway to Broadway & 8th Street, and wait for the 51A. If you want to get on the bus at Jack London Square, board the 72, 72M or the 72R and exit at Broadway & 19th Street (BART).

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Stay tuned next week to see which attraction we'll be featuring next!

#20: Great Mall

Posted on August 12, 2015 at 3:30 AM Comments comments (0)

This week on Transit Accessible Attractions we will be talking about the Great Mall.

 

The Great Mall is the largest indoor outlet mall in Northern California. It features 200 outlet stores, including Last Call by Neiman Marcus, Coach Factory Store, Saks Fifth Avenue OFF 5TH, H&M, Forever 21, Abercrombie & Fitch Outlet, Gap and Michael Kors. There are many dining options as well, like Dave and Busters and Jollibee. It serves the local communities of Milpitas, Fremont and San Jose.

 

Great Mall is increbibly accessible by transit, with Great Mall/Main station right near the Mall. The Great Mall/Main station is served by VTA bus routes 46, 47, 66, 70, 71, 77, 104, 180, 181, 321 and AC Transit bus route 217.


From Fremont BART, take VTA Express route 180 or 181 to Great Mall/Main, or AC Transit route 217 to the Great Mall. The VTA express buses are more expensive, but are faster than AC Transit's 217.


VTA Light Rail is a great option if you're riding from the South Bay, with great connections to CalTrain - Just take the Santa Teresa to Alum Rock route (901) to Great Mall/Main. 

 

Stay tuned next week to find out which attraction we'll feature next!

#19: Angel Island

Posted on August 5, 2015 at 10:20 AM Comments comments (0)

This week on Transit Accessible Attractions we will be talking about Angel Island.


Angel Island is a California State Park, and is the largest natural island in the Bay Area. Nestled in the waters of the San Francisco Bay, Angel Island provided visitors with astonishing views of the surrounding urban landscape. 


Angel Island has a fascinating history few other places can surpass. The island has been habited by humans for tens of thousands of years, starting with the native people of the Coast Miwok. Angel Island served as a local hunting location for tribes, as well as a stop for food and supplies for travelers.


In the early 1900's, Angel Island's U.S. Immigration Station processed thousands upon thousands of immigrants, particularly from China. During the Second World War, German and Japanese POWs were detained before being sent to facilities further inland on Angel Island. 


Angel Island as a State Park began to take shape in 1954, when the western side of the Island, Ayala Cove, was dedicated as a State Park for visitors. By the time all military personnel left in the early 60's, the entire island was declared a California State Park.


To preserve the natural beauty of Angel Island, the only way to reach the island is through ferries. The Blue & Gold Fleet Ferries transport thousands of visitors every year, and are just one of two ferry services that provide trips to Angel Island. 


The Blue & Gold Fleet Ferries run from the Ferry Building, Pier 41, and Angel Island, before returning to San Francisco. Ferries wait 10 minutes at Angel Island before returning to the City. 


During weekdays, there is one service that starts at the Ferry Building and ends at Angel Island, stopping at Pier 41 along the way. This ferry departs the Ferry Building at 9:15 AM. The next ferry, at 1:05 PM, begins its journey at Pier 41, continuing to Angel Island. The last trip starts at Angel Island at 3:10 PM and returns to Pier 41.


During weekends and holidays, there are four ferries that run to Angel Island - two start at the Ferry Building, stopping at Pier 41 and continuing to Angel Island. One starts at Pier 41, arrives Angel Island, and terminates at Pier 41 once again. The last ferry starts at Angel Island and travels to Pier 41.


The other ferry service to Angel Island is the Angel Island/Tiburon Ferry. This ferry service travels between Downtown Tiburon and Angel Island in approximately 10 minutes. The Angel Island/Tiburon Ferry's schedule varies depending on the month. To view the ferry's schedule, visit http://www.angelislandferry.com/FerryServices/Schedule.aspx.


Stay tuned next week to see which attraction we'll feature next!

#18: Stoneridge Mall

Posted on July 29, 2015 at 10:05 AM Comments comments (0)

This week on Transit Accessible Attractions we will be featuring Stoneridge Mall.


Stoneridge Mall features about 165 stores, including Macy's, Sears, JCPenney, and Nordstrom. Stoneridge Mall serves the local communites of Pleasanton, Dublin, San Ramon, Livermore and Danville. The mall also has many great restaurants such as the California Pizza Kitchen and the Cheesecake Factory, as well as many fast food restaurants.

 

Stoneridge Mall is served by WHEELS Bus Routes 3, 10, 53, 70XV, and RAPID, as well as great access to BART.


The 3 is a loop service that runs between East Dublin/Pleasanton BART, Stoneridge Mall, West Dublin and back to East Dublin/Pleasanton BART (clockwise). During the morning, the 3 runs clockwise and during the evening, the 3 runs counterclockwise.


The 10 runs limited service to Stoneridge Mall, only running there from 5 AM to 8 AM. During the rest of the day, the 10 runs between East Dublin/Pleasanton BART to Downtown Livermore and beyond.


The 53 travels from Pleasanton ACE Station to Stoneridge Mall, continuing back to ACE. This route does not operate in the middle of the day. Buses on this line may wait up to 30 minutes for late-arriving ACE Trains in the morning, but not in the evening.


The 70XV provides very limited service to Stoneridge Mall, arriving once in the morning and once in the evening. The 70XV travels from Pleasant Hill BART to Walnut Creek BART, continues on I-680, reaches Stoneridge Mall, and ends at East Dublin/Pleasanton BART. The 70XV travels back in the evening.


The best way to reach Stoneridge Mall from Pleasanton, Dublin and Livermore is the RAPID. Run by LAVTA (WHEELS), the RAPID runs every 15 minutes all day, every day (except weekends), and features hybrid electric buses.


The RAPID travels from Stoneridge Mall to East Dublin/Pleasanton BART to Downtown Livermore, and eventually terminates at Sandia/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories.


Stoneridge Mall is also accessible by BART, with West Dublin/Pleasanton Station located right next to Stoneridge Mall. Once you have exited the train, proceed through the faregates and walk through the Pleasanton Bridge (west side of the station). The Pleasanton Bridge drops you across the street from Stoneridge Mall. You can also transfer to WHEELS buses from here.


Stay tuned next week to see which attraction we'll feature next!

#17: San Francisco Ferry Building

Posted on July 22, 2015 at 9:45 AM Comments comments (0)

This week on Transit Accessible Attractions we will be talking about the San Francisco Ferry Building.


Every year, millions of visitors are welcomed to San Francisco by the Ferry Building. The Ferry Building is one of the best icons in San Francisco. Seen from miles, the Ferry Building sticks out into the San Francisco Bay. Appropriately named, the Ferry Building is the terminal of all major ferry services in the Bay Area. 


The Ferry Building features a 245-foot clock tower, with four massive clock dials, each reaching 22 feet in diameter. Completed in 1898, the Ferry Building has survived two major earthquakes.


The top floor of the Ferry Building is used as office space, but the bottom floor features the Ferry Building Marketplace, a wide collection of stores and restaurants In 2003, the 660-foot long Great Nave was repaired. In addition, the largest San Francisco Farmer's Market, the Ferry Plaza Farmer's Market,  takes place on Saturdays, directly in front of the ferry building. 


The Ferry Building has, possibly, the greatest location in San Francisco. Located on the Embarcadero, you can see the Ferry Building dead ahead from Market Street. Which is why the Ferry Building is one of the most transit accessible attractions in the Bay Area.


MUNI's world-famous old streetcars, which run on the F Market & Wharves Line, stop right in front of the Ferry Building. The F Market Streetcars travel from the Castro Neighborhood, down Market Street, along the Embarcadero, and terminate at Fisherman's Wharf. The old streetcars is the best and most historic way to reach the Ferry Building.


Another method of historic transit includes the Cable Car! The California & Market Cable Care Line travels along California Street and terminates at Drumm & Market, providing quick access to the old streetcars and dozens of buses. The Drumm & Market Cable Car Stop is a couple blocks from the Ferry Building.


Embarcadero Station is located one block from the Ferry Building, on Market Street. Embarcadero Station is shared by BART and MUNI, providing direct access to people from San Francisco and people from the East Bay, Peninsula and beyond.


If you are riding CalTrain, exit at Millbrae Station and transfer to BART. Keep in mind that BART's Yellow Line does not terminate at Millbrae until 8 PM on weekdays. Use the Richmond (Red) Line during weekdays. 


Most ferry services in the bay area terminate at the Ferry Building, including the Golden Gate Ferry. To plan your trip, visit the 511 Transit Trip Planner.


Stay tuned next week to find out which attraction we'll feature next!

#16: SF Japantown

Posted on July 16, 2015 at 3:05 AM Comments comments (0)

This week on Transit Accessible Attractions we will be featuring San Francisco's Japantown.

 

San Francisco's Japantown is one of the last Japantowns in the United States. You can experience the japanese culture with shops, restaurants, and the many events held in Japantown each year. In the middle of the shopping mall there is an outdoor Japanese Peace Plaza, which features the peace pagoda that was a gift from the people of Osaka, Japan.


There are a few buses that stop near Japantown- you can ride Muni Routes 38 or 38R to Geary and Laguna. You can also take Muni Route 2 Clement or 3 Jacksonm and get off at either Laguna or Buchanan.


From BART, exit at Montgomery and ride the 38 or 38R to Geary and Laguna and you're quickly at Japantown.

 

Stay tuned next week to see which attraction we'll feature next!

#15: Lombard Street

Posted on July 8, 2015 at 8:40 AM Comments comments (0)

This week on Transit Accessible Attractions we will be featuring "the crookedest street in the world," Lombard Street.


Lombard Street is known as the crookedest street in the world, with a 16% grade. It's not, however, the crookedest street in America, the world, or even San Francisco (that award goes to Vermont Street in Portrero Hill). However, with eight switchbacks and thousands of tourists every day, Lombard Street is one of the most famous streets in the world, boasting some of the most expensive houses in San Francisco.


Lombard Street boasts a 16% grade, but did you know it was once much steeper? In the early 1900's, people discovered the 27% grade hill was too steep for cars to safely traverse, as well as pedestrians. Proposed by a property owner, the 8 switchbacks shortened Lombard Street's grade to 16% and made it possible for cars to safely reach the bottom of the hill.


Lombard Street is one of the few main attractions in San Francisco to be accessible by the world-famous cable cars. Out of the three cable car lines, two go to Lombard Street, the Powell-Mason and the Powell-Hyde. Both end up at the Powell Street Cable Car Turnaround, at the intersection of Powell and Market. 


The Powell-Hyde cable car runs along Powell and Hyde Streets, eventually terminating at Fisherman's Wharf. The Powell-Hyde stops directly above Lombard Street.


The Powell-Mason cable car also terminates at Fisherman's Wharf, running along Powell and Mason Streets. The Powell-Mason stops two blocks away from the bottom of Lombard Street, at Lombard & Columbus.


If you are riding BART, exit at Powell Station and proceed to Powell Street, right above the station. Both cable cars terminate at the end of Powell Street on the cable car turnaround.


There are a few buses that stop near Lombard Street as well, most notably, the 30-Stockton, which travels between CalTrain (4th & King) and the Marina District via Fisherman's Wharf. Exit at the intersection between Columbus & Lombard and proceed 2.5 blocks west on Lombard Street, where the curvy part begins.


The 41-Union runs along Union Street and goes between Howard, in SOMA, and the Presidio. If you want to go to the bottom of Lombard Street, exit at Union & Leavenworth and walk three blocks north to the bottom of the hill. If you wish to reach the top, exit at the next stop, at Union & Hyde and walk three blocks north to the top of Lombard Street.


The 45-Union/Stockton runs between Townsend Street in SOMA and the Presidio. The 45 shares bus stops on Union with the 41, so both buses will drop you off three blocks from Lombard Street. To plan your trip, visit the 511 Transit Trip Planner.


Stay tuned next week to see which attraction we'll feature next!

#14: Levi's Stadium

Posted on July 1, 2015 at 6:20 PM Comments comments (0)

This week on Transit Accessible Attractions we will be talking about Levi's Stadium.

 

Levi's Stadium is in the heart of Silicon Valley in Santa Clara. This brand-new stadium houses the San Francisco 49ers. Next to Six Flags: Great America, This $1.2 billion stadium is 1.85 million square feet, with approximately 68,500 seats. Features include 165 luxury suites and 8,500 club seats. The stadium also includes the 49ers Museum.

 

If you are riding VTA, board light rail to Great America. The station is located on the north side of the stadium. You could also ride the VTA local buses 55, 57, and 60 to the stadium. During events VTA provides special express service to many places. Click here to find out more about the VTA service to Levi's Stadium.

If you are riding ACE or Capitol Corridor, exit at Great America Station. ACE provides special event service to major events.


If you are riding CalTrain, exit at Mountain View Station and transfer to VTA light rail to Great America Station. Don't forget, you need to pay for a VTA fare and a CalTrain fare. CalTrain does provide extra service for major events. Click here for more information. 

 

Stay tuned next week to find out which attraction we'll feature next!


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